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    I have Xfinity gigabit ethernet. I have pretty good coverage over all of my house, but with more smart home devices being added each year (some outside) and 4k streaming, torrenting, etc. being part of my weekly usage, I’d like to utilize my fire hose as well as I possibly can.Some details on the devices: the core of my setup is an Xfinity provided Technicolor TC4400-CMT Rev. 3.3. Never had an issue with it. On the back it has what appear to be 2 ethernet/internet out ports. I’ve only ever had one thing connected to it, which is the Netgear Nighthawk X6 router that came from Xfinity free when I signed up (not rented, actually given free!). It’s also generally worked really well. Connected to the Nighthawk via it’s 4 LAN ports are: my PC (gets close to a gigabit down), a Netgear Arlo hub, a Hue lights hub, and a TP-Link AV2000 Powerline Adapter Kit. The Nighthawk throws a 2.4ghz network and a 5ghz network.These things generally have worked well. The Powerline kit has just been used to just get a more reliable connection to my smart TV downstairs and a PS4 Pro. The smart home devices making use of my 2.4ghz wi-fi network are as follows: a Nest thermostat, several Hue lightbulbs, an Arlo indoor camera, a few TP-Link Kasa dimmer switches, 3 Sonos speakers, an LG smart TV (streaming 4K) and (most newly added) a Ring Spotlight camera that’s outside. The Ring gets an ok connection but it could be better.The other devices are an Apple TV 4K, a 2012 Macbook Air (torrenting, streaming), two iPhones and the occasional tablet, etc.At this point, I’ve realized that’s a lot of devices, and the bandwidth is probably getting spread thin, not optimally, not reaching everything well enough, etc. Additionally, having both the 2.4ghz network and 5ghz can get a little confusing and wonky at times. Yesterday, on a whim, I decided that a mesh network would solve all of my problems. Did some googling, decided the Netgear Orbi seemed like what I needed, went to Best Buy, did the quick setup and...was disappointed and frustrated. I quickly realized this probably was not the right solution for a gigabit connection I want to make as full use of as possible, and it wasn’t even as seamless and simple as I thought it might be regarding things just working. Speeds were slower than before, devices were confused, etc.More research seemed to point to using an ethernet cable to setup an Access Point somewhere else in my house as the best solution (without fully wiring ethernet all over my house).So: What can I do to just spread that bandwidth more uniformly and allow the devices that need the bandwidth to make best use of it? From the small amount of research I’ve done, it seems like an access point setup downstairs, closer to my media devices and my cameras (and several hue and kasa lights) is the best option without doing a ton of hardwiring. How to properly do this is where I need a bit of help. I’ve ordered this Access Point: TP-Link AC1750 Wireless Wi-Fi Access Point (Supports 802.3AT PoE+, Dual Band, 802.11AC)Once I get that, my plan is to do as follows: plug the Access Point into a LAN port on my router (doesn’t matter which one, right?) using my 100ft CAT6 cable (for now, until I decide this is worth running an ethernet wire through the cieling/walls) and set it up in my media cabinet downstairs. Then...I configure the Access Point to be an access point. That’s the part I don’t really know how to do. For example, some of my questions are:Does it have to be ceiling mounted, or is that just what businesses typically do?After I hook up the Access Point downstairs, what are the vital configuration settings (stuff involving SSID, DHCP, DNS, static IP, etc.) in the router and AP I need to have matched to make this work correctly? How will I know it’s actually working? Will my devices still connect to the same network names as they used to, "Network 2.4" and "Network 5" or will the AP create even more network names? I want to keep it to just the two (or even one, if that makes more sense). Other related question that seem to involve Access Points:Does a PoE switcher just provide additional lan ports for a router and also power PoE-enabled devices to just not have to deal with ac adapters or electrical wiring?Anything I’m missing here? Is this probably going to get the job done? Any and all help and opinions is very much appreciated, thank you!

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